meanwhile, right here

Today’s online finds: Inspirational, educational and very close to home. I grew up with Carly, and her family’s story needs to be heard. Her voice has been strong, loud and clear and now it’s our turn to do our part. Please Share. Support. Donate. Write. Speak up.

     

Dear X

I’m writing in support of families who have children impacted by Autism and whose children are faced with a mental health or behavioural crisis related to their diagnosis. The province of Nova Scotia must step up to the table and provide the supports necessary for these complex cases involving children in crisis.

Namely, I am insisting the government:

1. Ensure families with children in crisis have access to necessary resources to maintain the safety of their home (funded in-home support);
2. Ensure coordination between the departments of community services, health, and education to develop a shared plan of support for children who are in crisis;
3. To continue publicly funded, evidence-based interventions for children affected by Autism past the age of six.

Thank you for your consideration.

Best,

Here’s a list of MLAs:

Bill Horne
Fall River/Waverley
billhornemla@gmail.com

Ben Jessome
Hammonds Plains
jessomeben@gmail.com

Kelly Regan
Bedford
kelly@kellyregan.ca

Claudia Chender
Ochterloney St., Dartmouth
claudiachendermla@gmail.com

Dave Wilson
Lower Sackville
avewilsonmla@eastlink.ca

Tim Harrison
Main Street, Dartmouth
larryharrisonmla@gmail.com

Barbara Adams
Eastern Passage, NS
barbadamsmla@gmail.com

Patricia Arab
Joe How Dr.
info@patriciaarab.ca

Jaimie Baillie
Springhill, NS
jamiebaillie@bellaliant.com

Gary Burrill
Quinpool Rd, Halifax
garyburrillmla@gmail.com

Keith Colwell
East Preston, Dartmouth
keithcolwell@eastlink.ca

Lena Metlege Diab
Craigmore Drive, Halifax
nfo@lenadiab.ca

Rafah DiCostanzo
Lacewood Dr, Halifax
Rafah@Rafahdicostanzo.com

Tony Ince
Cole Harbour
tonyince@tonyincemla.ca

Brad Johns
Middle Sackville
mlabradjohns@gmail.com

Labi Kousoulis
Spring Garden Road, Halifax
labi@labimla.ca

Susan Leblanc
Wyse Road, Dartmouth
susanleblancMLA@bellaliant.com

Brendan Maguire
Herring Cove, Halifax
brendan@brendanmaguire.ca

Lisa Roberts
Young St, Halifax
lisarobertsmla@gmail.com

calendar girl is ten!

Mark your calendar, 2018 is coming!

It’s my tenth year making desktop calendars and after great success last year, I have decided to stock up on more cases and do it again (thanks, all).

This year I have decided to give 50% of the sales towards two awesome local organizations: Hope For Wildlife and Feed Nova Scotia. The cost of a calendar is $10 (and $5 if you already have a case and just need a refill). Guys, that means if I sell 100 calendars in cases, Hope For Wild Life will get $250 and Feed Nova Scotia will get $250… that’s a lot of lettuce!

Here’s the Hello 2018 calendar (hello stocking stuffer):

The calendar is ~5″ x 5.5″ at sits in a clear plastic calendar case (similar in size to a CD case). They’re printed digitally at a local printer and I package everything at home. Below is an example:

If you are interested in one, please send a private request to meghanrushton@icloud.com before December 1 (and let me know if you want the case) – I need to order and package all of them which takes time! Everyone near and far will receive their calendar by December 23. *If you live outside of Halifax and need one (or more) mailed, I will add shipping to the cost. 

I hope you enjoy this year’s calendar as much as I enjoy making them. And I hope all the loyal refill clients are up for supporting two important causes.

Thank you for your support!

***

Here’s some info on the two organizations:

Hope for Wildlife (hopeforwildlife.net)Hope for Wildlife is a charitable wildlife rehabilitation and education organization located in Seaforth, Nova Scotia. Since 1997, we have rescued, rehabilitated, and released over 40,000 injured and orphaned wild animals representing over 250 species.

In addition to the ongoing provision of care we offer, Hope for Wildlife aims to connect people to wildlife in a positive way through knowledge and understanding. Every year, we assist over 10,000 callers through our wildlife helpline, welcome thousands of visitors to our facilities for tours, give hundreds of offsite educational presentations to community and school groups, and collect a wide range of data from animals treated at our rehabilitation centre.

Feed Nova Scotia (feednovascotia.ca): Our mission is to feed Nova Scotians in need and reduce that need. To achieve this, we distribute almost 2 million kilograms of donated food to our member network of 146 food banks and meal programs across the province. Our role also extends beyond food. We support our members as they build capacity to serve their communities, and we help raise awareness of the challenges hunger and poverty create each day for thousands of Nova Scotians.

 

psst. If you like what you’re reading, please subscribe and share. xomeg

Archive of previous editions: 2017/2016  + 2014-2009

how to be an awesome cheerleader

Really, who doesn’t want to be awesome at cheerleading?

I’m living in the post-marathon / it’s cold outside blue period so I want to lighten things up with something fun. Cheerleading. I have taken field notes and am here to report on some great tips – mostly related to running events however, I think you can modify them for anything (cook-offs, dance-offs, the theatre, surviving winter, etc.)

In no particular order, here they are:

  1. Signage: 1-DSC_044911-IMG_2461 Be funny, send love to strangers, support your team… So many great reasons to invest in some cardboard, markers and glitter glue. The best distraction while running is reading all of the signs so make it good. Here are some of my favourites:
    “Go Mommy” / “The only marathon I do is Netflix / Remember, you paid to do this / “I don’t know you, but you’re doing awesome / “You’re Running Better than the Government” / “Running shoes: $120, Race: $75, Finishing: Priceless”. Also, I noticed a new trend: People are making cut-outs of their runner’s faces and posting them on sticks that they hold high – like lollipops. Kind of creepy but effective. You will totally notice your big head bobbing high in a crowd. Or alternatively…
  2. Balloon or umbrellas: 2-IMG_2539 The best way to stand out in a crowd is be tall. Easier said than done so buy some balloons or fun umbrellas and hold them high. Your runner will spot them easily. At the Cabot Trail Relay we had 4 & 2 balloons for our team number. Easily spotable until they popped in the car on leg 3. My poor teammates were terrified. In Chicago, a group had matching kid’s froggy umbrellas – I saw those five green and speckled frogs many times. Adorable.
  3. Cheer loud, send happy thoughts and have fun: 3-IMG_2598There will be music, so dance. Cow bells and bear bells are encouraged. Cheer for strangers. I will never forget the woman who yelled: “It’s all downhill from here” near the end of my first half marathon. She wasn’t lying and I really needed that positive encouragement.
  4. Pick a side: 4-simpsons-lefty As the Chicago marathon was about to start, I realized I should of talked to my family about what side of the road I’d run on so we could better find each other. When there are 1.7 million people on the sideline and 45,000 runners, it is a needle-in-a-haystack situation. Luckily my mom knows me well enough that I am left-handed proud and will always choose the left.
  5. What not to wear: 5-IMG_3576 Not a time for heels – being a cheerleader is a serious workout. You may be running to several spots on the course. You will be up on your tiptoes. You will be jumping and juggling signage, water and a camera. You may need to jump in an offer support and encouragement. Be prepared. No one, not even a cheerleader, should loose a toenail. And speaking of clothing, know what your runner is wearing so you can spot them in the crowd easier.
  6. High-fives: 6-IMG_5106 I once heard someone yell “high-fives make you stronger”. It’s true. Give them out, they’re free. I always try and take one from the kids.
  7. Gear: 7-IMG_3554 Mike calls himself Sherpa-Mike whenever there’s a race because he has to carry a backpack full of post run stuff (flip flops, food, water, the camera, my phone, clothing). Get a good bag, save your back. Also wear a watch – preferably a stop watch so you can track the time. It’s helpful to know your runner’s pace so you’ll have a better idea of when to start holding up the awesome sign you made (see #1 & 2).
  8. Meet-up spot: DSC_33148-IMG_2512
    At the end of the San Francisco half marathon I quickly realized I didn’t plan a meet-up spot with my parents. Not smart when there are 35,000 runners. Not smart when your iPhone dies after taking pics of the cute fireman who were passing out Tiffany necklaces at the finish line. Not smart when they have no idea what you were wearing. Luckily the race organizers are smarter than me and had a “call a friend” station set up. I was able to call my dad and find them right away.
  9. Training: 9-IMG_3529Listen, join, and practice. Listen to them ramble on and on about their training and join in if you can. That way you’ll know their speed and needs. Leading up to Philadelphia, my mom practice running and jumped in for encouragement (I had no idea she ran) – she kept me company and took my jacket all without needing to stop or slow down. Since then, she’ll often join me on her bike during long runs or family members will come and get me at the end of a run.
  10. Music: 10-say-anything-e1402066953749 Does your runner have a pump-up song? Play it. We made a mix for our Cabot Trail Relay team with each teammate’s favourite song and played the song during their leg. At the Rum runner’s relay we brought the songs back and no joke, Eminem is a solid cheerleader.

So that’s it. Happy training and good luck next season!

psst. let me know if you have any other tips
psst. let me know if you have signed up for anything already!
psst. If you like what you’re reading, please subscribe and share. xomeg